How to Tell If a Dog Is Stressed Out and What To Do.

Reviewed, fact-checked & edited by Marcella Raskin.
If you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Do you know how to tell if your dog is stressed? It can be difficult to know since dogs often show signs of stress differently than humans do. In this blog post, we will discuss the signs of stress in dogs and how to help them feel more at ease. If you are concerned that your dog may be stressed, it is important to take action immediately!

Panting or heavy breathing

Dog panting or heavy breathing

One of the most common signs that your dog is stressed is if they are panting heavily or breathing quickly. It’s also one of the most difficult to spot since dogs pant all the time, even when they’re not stressed. However, if you notice your dog panting more than usual or their breathing is particularly labored, it is often a sign that they are feeling anxious or nervous about something.

If you think your dog is stressed, you can do a few things to help them relax. First, try to identify the source of their stress and remove it from their environment. If that’s not possible, try to provide them with a safe space where they can relax and de-stress. Is there a new person in the house? Are they not getting enough exercise? There are some possible causes, but it is important to try and figure out what is causing your dog stress.

Finally, make sure you provide them with plenty of love and attention. Dogs are social creatures and need plenty of time to bond with their human companions. If you think your dog may be stressed, take some extra time to cuddle with them, go for walks together, or play fetch. Often, the best way to help a stressed dog is simply by spending more time with them.

Excessive shedding

Another common sign of stress in dogs is excessive shedding. If you notice that your dog is shedding more than usual, it may be a sign that they are feeling anxious or stressed. This is particularly true if you notice patches of hair missing, as this can be a sign of self-mutilation due to stress.

Excessive shedding can be caused by various factors, including changes in diet, anxiety, and allergies. If your dog is suddenly shedding a lot of furs, it’s important to take note of other changes in their behavior. If they seem uninterested in playing or spending time with you, are restless or pacing, or are hiding more than usual, these could be signs that they’re feeling stressed.

You may want to consult with a veterinarian, as they may be able to recommend a course of treatment or medication to help reduce your dog’s stress levels.

Shedding is normal for dogs, and you shouldn’t be too concerned unless it’s excessive. To control excessive shedding, brush your dog regularly with a de-shedding tool and give them baths as needed. You should also make sure they eat a healthy diet and get enough exercise.

Excessive barking or whining

Anyone who has ever lived with a dog knows that they can be vocal animals. Whether it’s a joyous bark when someone comes home or a plaintive whine when they’re feeling lonely, dogs use their voices to communicate their needs and emotions. However, sometimes excessive barking or whining can be a sign that the dog is stressed.

If your dog is barking more than usual, it could be a sign that they’re feeling anxious or threatened. Look for other signs of stress, such as pacing, panting, or shaking, and see if you can identify the source of the stress. If you can’t, it’s best to consult with a veterinarian or animal behaviorist to help get to the bottom of the problem.

In the meantime, try to provide your dog with a calm environment and plenty of positive reinforcement when they are quiet. There are a few things you can do to help curb the behavior. First, make sure that they have plenty of exercise – a tired dog is much less likely to bark or whine. And second, provide them with plenty of mental stimulation – things like puzzle toys or training sessions can help tire them out mentally and physically. With a little patience and effort, you should be able to reduce your dog’s excessive barking or whining.

 Dogs may become withdrawn or inactive when they’re stressed.

If your dog suddenly stops playing with its toys, seems uninterested in going for walks, or is no longer interested in spending time with you, it may feel stressed. Dogs can become withdrawn or inactive when they’re anxious, depressed, or sick. If you think this might be the case, consult with a veterinarian to rule out any medical causes.

If your dog is stressed, you can do a few things to help them relax. First, make sure they’re getting enough exercise – a tired dog is much less likely to be anxious or stressed. And second, provide them with plenty of opportunities to socialize – things like dog parks or playdates with other dogs can be great. Instead of forcing them to interact, let them approach other dogs on their own terms. With a little time and patience, you should be able to help your dog overcome their stress and enjoy life again.

Dogs may become destructive when they’re stressed.

Dogs may become destructive when they are stressed

If your normally well-behaved dog starts chewing up your shoes or ripping up your couch, it may be a sign that they’re feeling stressed. Dogs can become destructive when they’re anxious, bored, or frustrated. If you think this might be the case, try to provide your dog with more exercise and mental stimulation. If the problem persists, consult with a veterinarian or animal behaviorist to get to the root of the problem.

In the meantime, there are a few things you can do to help prevent your dog from destroying your belongings. First, make sure they have plenty of toys and chew bones to keep them occupied. Second, provide them with a safe place to vent their energy – a dog park or backyard play area is perfect for this. And finally, crate training can be a great way to prevent destructive behaviors when you’re not home. You should be able to assist your dog in overcoming its harmful habit with a little persistence and hard work.

Dogs may become aggressive when they’re stressed.

Any dog owner knows that sometimes their beloved pet can act out in aggression, whether it’s snapping at another dog or biting a stranger. But what many people don’t realize is that often, this aggression is simply a manifestation of stress. Dogs are highly attuned to the emotions of their owners, and if they sense that their owner is stressed, it can trigger a stress response in the dog as well.

This can be further exacerbated by other factors such as lack of exercise, separation anxiety, and even boredom. So next time your dog seems to be acting out, try to take a step back and assess the situation. It may just be that your furry friend is feeling a little bit stressed.

If the stressor is something that can’t be removed, like a move to a new home, then you’ll need to help your dog adjust to the change. This may mean taking extra time for walks and training sessions and being extra patient when your dog makes mistakes.

They might have trouble sleeping or restlessness.

Just like humans, dogs can get stressed out. And when they do, it can affect their sleep. They may have trouble falling asleep or wake up more during the night, and as a result, they may be more tired during the day. They may also be restless, pacing back and forth or panting heavily. If your dog is displaying any of these behaviors, it’s important to take steps to help them relax. Maybe they need more exercise or attention during the day. Or perhaps they’re feeling anxious about something specific, like a move or a new baby in the family.

 If your dog is showing any of these signs, it’s important to take steps to reduce their stress. This may include providing them with a quiet place to rest, investing in a dog massage, or simply spending more time playing with them. By reducing your dog’s stress, you’ll help them get the quality sleep they need.

Dogs may start to self-mutilate.

One of the more serious signs that your dog is stressed is self-mutilation. This can manifest in many ways, including excessive licking, chewing, or biting at their skin or fur. In severe cases, dogs may even pull out their own hair. If you notice your dog engaging in any of these behaviors, it’s important to take them to the vet right away. Self-mutilation can be a sign of physical pain, but it can also be a symptom of psychological distress.

The good news is that there are a few things you can do to help your dog if they’re self-mutilating. First, try to identify the stressor and remove it if possible. If the self-mutilation is due to anxiety, some products on the market can help to ease your dog’s fears. And finally, if the self-mutilation is due to boredom or lack of exercise, try to increase their activity level and provide them with more stimulating toys. With a little time and patience, you should be able to help your dog overcome their stress and get back to their normal selves.

Dogs may have a decrease in appetite.

Dogs may have a decrease in appetite

One of the most common signs that your dog is stressed is decreased appetite. This can be due to several factors, including anxiety, depression, and even physical pain. If your dog suddenly stops eating or is losing weight, it’s important to take them to the vet to rule out any medical causes. If the vet gives them a clean bill of health, your dog is likely stressed.

You can do a few things to help your dog eat again. First, try to feed them in a quiet place away from any potential stressors. And second, offer them small meals more often throughout the day instead of one large meal. With a little time and patience, you should be able to help your dog overcome their stress and get back to their normal eating habits.

 Common causes of stress in dogs.

Many things can cause stress in dogs. Some of the more common causes include:

  • Changes in routine: Dogs are creatures of habit, and they like having a set routine. Any changes to that routine, such as a move to a new home or the addition of a new family member, can be stressful for them.
  • Lack of exercise: Dogs need to burn off excess energy, and if they’re not getting enough exercise, it can lead to stress.
  • Separation anxiety: This is a common problem in dogs who are left alone for long periods. They may start to worry that you’re never coming back, which can cause a great deal of stress.
  • Fear of loud noises: Dogs have much sharper hearing than we do, and they can be easily scared by loud noises, such as thunderstorms or fireworks.
  • Lack of socialization: Dogs are social animals, and if they’re not getting enough time to interact with other dogs or people, it can lead to stress.

If you think your dog is stressed, it’s important to take steps to help them. This may include providing them with a quiet place to rest, investing in a dog massage, or simply spending more time playing with them. By reducing your dog’s stress, you’ll help them get the quality sleep they need.

Conclusion.

Several things can cause stress in dogs, but you can also do many things to help them. If you think your dog is stressed, take steps to reduce their stressors and increase their activity level. With a little time and patience, you should be able to help your dog overcome their stress and get back to their normal selves.

Do you think your dog is stressed? What are some of the signs you’ve noticed? Let us know in the comments below!

Leave a Comment

10 Best for Pets